1905-12-02 THE SEVASTOPOL MUTINY

London Times, 2 December 1905, p. 5: THE SEVASTOPOL MUTINY./EFFECT ON THE BOURSE. (FROM A CORRESPONDENT.) ST. PETERSBURG, DEC. 1.

            The publication of the official reports of the Sevastopol tragedy has somewhat allayed the panic. Comparatively few people, however, are inclined to believe all the statements of the local authorities, arguing that they naturally seek to minimize the importance of the mutiny, and the Bourse, therefore, has remained terribly weak. Fours to-day fell half a point still lower. The Russ makes a significant comparison between the effects of external and internal disasters upon Russian bonds. Thus, after the fall of Port Arthur Fours were quoted at 89, after Mukden at 80½, after Tsu Shima at 83½, and after Sevastopol at 70.

            According to official reports submitted to the Emperor, the majority of the squadron remained a passive spectator of the battle. This may be ascribed to the fact that all the breech blocks had been removed and the engines uncoupled. The batteries all remained loyal. The Brest Regiment stormed the naval barracks. The rebel combatants numbered altogether 2,000, mostly time-expired sailors. The Otchakoff fired only five rounds, although she had 360 rounds on board. A few houses were damaged. The number of the killed and wounded is unknown.

            The Emperor in conversation with a high personage yesterday appeared cheerful and expressed the greatest satisfaction with the conduct of the troops, especially the men of the Brest Regiment. I learn that the military chaplains were chiefly responsible for the return of this regiment to its allegiance.

            There is no truth whatever in the rumours which were current yesterday of an alleged attempt on the Tsar’s life.  

Provided by Stephen McLaughlin

 

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